The Tragic Real-Life Story Of John Mellencamp

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 The Tragic Real-Life Story Of John Mellencamp


After the hard rocking success of American Fool and Uh-Huh, John Mellencamp doubled down on the social commentary and soul-searching with his mid-’80s albums Scarecrow and The Lonesome Jubilee. Among the biggest sellers of his career, they were certified for sales of five million and three million copies, respectively. But the success of those albums bears a painful asterisk: Mellencamp used the songwriting process for Scarecrow and The Lonesome Jubilee to cope with the deaths of loved ones and how his family shaped him. “Let’s face it, you are your parents, whether any of us like it or not,” he told The New York Times.The Lonesome Jubilee, like Scarecrow and the rest of my best stuff, is about me and my family tree grappling against both the world and our own inner goddamned whirlwind.” Todos los regalos y muestras gratis, promociones, productos gratis, cupones descuento, sorteos, concursos, ofertas España del 2022 Muestras gratis y regalos



His grandfather, with whom he was incredibly close, died of lung cancer in 1983. “Just before his death, he called everybody into his bedroom, and although he wasn’t a religious person he said, ‘You know, I’m having a real bad beating of a time with the Devil.’ … It stopped me cold to see my Grandpa so scared. Six hours later, he was gone.” After the death, his uncle, Joe, “became the kindest soul you could imagine.” But then he died, too. “‘Paper in Fire,'” from The Lonesome Jubilee, “is about Joe, and the family’s ingrained anger,” Mellencamp said in David Masciotra’s Mellencamp: American Troubadour.





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